Music


My own playing? Well, it’s better than it was yesterday.

Three cheers for Mona Charen in her endeavors to learn to play the cello. Bravo! Cello Notes – Mona Charen http://m.townhall.com/columnists/monacharen/2013/02/19/cello-notes-n1515082?utm_source=thdaily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nl

This is a pleasant way to start your Tuesday morning.

So, for my avid few readers, you may have noticed that I skipped a number of entries in this recent blogging project. We went on vacation and between planning for vacation, going on vacation, and recovering from vacation I haven’t been able to keep up with this ambitious project (not to mention its hard to do from my phone). I may try and go back and update those posts so that I can say that I’ve actually completed the project. On the other hand, that may take me some time.

Anyway, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts from Andrew, Christian, and Haley. I hope you check them out, too.

Luck Be A Lady, Frank Loesser

I was playing in Guys and Dolls last summer and this was probably my favorite tune from the show.

Here is Ol’ Blue Eyes and the Count Basie Orchestra:

The Tide is High by Blondie

Don’t ask why. I just remember listening to it in the car driving around the streets of Brattleboro.

Uh…this one is tough. I’m going with a hymn again.

There is Power in the Blood of the Lamb, Lewis Jones

When I think of guilt, I think of the guilt I have standing before a perfect God. Even the slightest imperfection on my part is like a horrendous stain in His sight. Thanks be to God for Jesus Christ, because he was perfect for my sake. Despite being guilty before our Lord, I am free because of what Jesus did on the cross. Therefore, even though I chose this for a song about guilt, it really is a song about redemption from the guilt.

This is a version by Fernando Ortega. I just discovered it. I’m not sold on it, but I like his ability to make it sound reflective.

I prefer a more peppy arrangement like this one:

 

Anything by Sergei Rachmaninoff.

I play the piano well enough to impress my youngest students, but that’s about where it ends. From my understanding of piano literature, Rachmaninoff is a “biggie” (fancy musical term for “that’s really impressive and hard stuff, man”). I figure, if I could play something by Rachmaninoff, then I could play just about anything, right?

Well, here is a sample:

Next Page »